Category Archives: Economics

Unions are cartels that should be subject to anti-trust laws

        Most people are familiar with the general idea of anti-trust laws and proceedings; but, as with many things the devil is in the details. A major problem that underscores this greater issue is a lack of understanding of the exact nature of labor. People often think of labor and capital as having a protagonist/antagonist relationship and this misconception is quite profitable to labor leaders and their political allies. However, the pervasiveness of this misconception does great harm to those who directly control labor—individuals; particularly those individuals who have the lowest skill levels which are most often the poor, minorities, and young people. People see laborers as having no leverage in the business relationship and thus assign laborers a more limited value.

        First of all, there are two primary factors of production: labor and capital. Labor is the efforts of people in producing goods and services for trade. Capital describes the accumulation of machinery and tools (often thought of monetarily) that are used in the production process. Neither factor holds a distinctive advantage over the other as a general rule, but differing circumstances can tip the scales of control to one or the other.

        This can be seen throughout history and even today. For example, there was a period in time when labor was so highly demanded (thus, labor held the advantage) that employers would wait outside of prisons to hire people as they were released. In the modern day, people who hold strong skills in computer programming or web design (etc.) can command significant salaries and benefits. These are not the instances that the media and politicians focus on; instead they choose to highlight the false narrative of the minimum wage and the “plight” of entry-level, low wage workers. This misses the reality of the damage done by labor unions by creating a sleight of hand, parlor trick.

         We—rightly—prosecute the collusion (cartelization) of business (owners of capital) if they join together to fix prices or production levels in a manner to extract much higher profits from the market than the competitive (more often the monopolistically competitive) value of their outputs. However, when it comes to labor unions, who collude openly on a national scale and across industry sectors (e.g. SEIU and AFL-CIO), we see that not as being an extortion of the consumer as we do in the capital example. Instead, we see labor unions—simply groups of individuals colluding to monopolize and thus increase their market power artificially—as merely protecting their members from an otherwise predatory institution. This is not the reality when it comes to mega-unions. The reality is that they are utilizing their control of one of the two primary factors of production in the same way businesses do when they collude; therefore consumers pay significantly higher prices which would resemble monopoly level pricing.

     Furthermore, just as other monopolies who do not enjoy regulatory protection by government which controls market entry, they induce others to enter the market and capture their market share by offering superior products at lower prices [note: natural monopolies that do not rely on regulatory control of market entry do exist; however, they are quite rare]. The effects of the monopoly, outside of government intervention, are often limited in their scope. We can see the results of this in the automobile market where, as trade restrictions relaxed (which is good for the US consumer), the foreign car producers began to rapidly grow against the domestic ones which were plagued by higher than natural equilibrium labor costs and diminishing relative quality (as a way to fight costs) versus the competition. The eventual result was that all those people who owned and controlled the labor factor of production in the car market and enjoyed higher than appropriate levels of profits (pay and benefits) ended up dropping their long run incomes to zero as new competitors entered and captured market share. From a labor perspective, these new market participants would include southern state workers who drew in production facilities as well as foreign workers (via outsourcing).

      Additionally, areas densely populated with people who enjoyed this monopoly level pricing for their labors collapsed as the monopoly structure of their labor force declined. Their government, bloated on the excess of extracting unrealistic levels of profits in their labor force from other areas in the country, could not sustain the drop in tax revenues and have essentially become ghost towns (Detroit’s population in 1950 was 1.8 million and is approximately 700,000 today). Also, the greater than equilibrium labor cost overall in markets like Detroit due to unionization of the auto industry crowded out other industries making Detroit perilously dependent on one industry.

        The real long-run winners in the equation have been the labor unions themselves (not their members) and the politicians who have enjoyed control of their votes and contributions for many years. The losers in the short run were workers that did not gain entry into those industries and, in the long run, all the people of areas once dominated by big labor production. People often say that unions were once a good thing and that somehow is supposed to justify the existence of mega union entities; however, I find that logic to be severely flawed. Instead, I argue that unions are still positive things when they are constrained to plant (or perhaps firm) level entities. This reduces large scale collusion while granting the owners of labor a more even position in the negotiating process without giving them unfettered control of the production of certain markets completely. Owners of a particular firm control all of the capital for that firm, but no single laborer controls all of the labor for a firm; therefore, an alliance of firm level labor can be positive without being punitive to consumers or damaging to the industry sector. Also, compulsory inclusion in unions should not exist because this removes the competitive nature of markets which allow a fair blend of profits to capital and labor simultaneously, while ensuring maximum marginal value to the consumers.

Regulation Is Not Our Salvation

        There is much talk of regulation and the need for it in every aspect of our “dangerous capitalistic” society; however, there is seldom talk of what regulation is and of what precisely it accomplishes. Ironically, the very people who exhibit the greatest disdain for “big business” are often the most ardent supporters of regulation (besides the big businesses themselves, of course). Democrats, and statists of all parties, are particularly interested in imposing regulations for the stated purpose of controlling the “animal instincts” of the free market. These are the same people who often deride big business publicly for taking advantage of consumers and keeping the “little man” down. And this is where it becomes interesting.

          What if I were to tell you that regulation is largely designed to do that very thing and that the politicians who both advocate and introduce regulation understand very clearly that it will remove competition by restricting new market participants? I know, I know–many people out there will be shaking their heads in outright refusal of this assertion. I can just hear it now: “we need government to protect us from big corporations”; or “that’s not what the news said”; or “Obama said we deregulated too much.” Food for thought, though: big opponents of airline deregulation were the (big) airlines and the big opponents of trucking deregulation?…you guessed it, the (big) trucking companies. That, by the way, is not an isolated situation.

          Now, before people start into the irrational argument that I hate all regulation or that I am an anarchist; try to refrain from acting arbitrarily dramatic, ‘cause it just ain’t true! Here is an example of the real world scenario and why most regulation is not only supported by “big business,” but also why they (and their lobbyists) write a significant amount of the legislation.

          Let us assume that I am a builder of houses in a small economy with a relatively static population (a miniature US, for example). I am the only builder of houses as I have been an innovator in early house building technology. Let us also assume I hired you to work for me as my helper and you worked your way up to foreman over some amount of time. At this point you realize that you know everything you would need to provide the same service that I do, but feel you can do it more cheaply (because I am operating as a monopolist and thus my pricing is artificially high). So, you strike out on your own and begin competing with me. This does not please me for obvious reasons.

          So, I go see the executive (president/governor) of this “state” we live and work in and I convince him that we should, for the safety of all consumers, get control of the house building market and pass some regulations so that amateur and dangerous new builders do not hurt anyone financially or physically. The executive, not wanting his constituents hurt or angry sees great value in regulation that will control the evil capitalists (besides me, of course as I will be grandfathered in…) and will make one of his major campaign contributors happy. He goes to the legislative branch and convinces them to draft a law; however, how can these lawmakers draft regulations about housing that will safeguard their citizens when they themselves have never built houses? Hmmmm…Wait, they have an idea—they should approach the local expert for help in constructing these regulations. My phone rings and I gladly accept my civic duty of drawing up regulations for housing standards so that I am guaranteed customers…I mean, so that the citizens are safe!

          Now, back to you, my only competitor; if am lucky I can build in professional fees and licensing, insurance, or even capital requirements that create a great enough obstacle to you not being able to continue in the market. If not, I have almost guaranteed that neither of our employees will likely ever be able to afford to compete with us.   Here is the best part, though. Having seen how well the appeal to citizens to safeguard them from “greedy profit-driven” capitalists worked out for his polling numbers; the executive decides to move on to another market segment. Once again, this executive finds great public support (who doesn’t want to be safer) and also finds he has more campaign contributions rolling in from companies which no longer have to fear any significant competition in their field.

     Here is the reality and the bad side of this equation. First, capitalism in this example no longer exists (incidentally, there has not been true capitalism in the U.S. for many decades except perhaps in some isolated market segments). The little man has been effectively “held down” and kept out of the marketplace. Skill, pricing, or a combination of the two is no longer that which is primarily supplied by market participants; instead, the ability to navigate the political waters and afford to pay for these regulatory burdens is what determines market participation.

          Second, the government has created a moral hazard in which the citizenry no longer feels responsible for ensuring quality in the products and services they purchase; additionally, government takes on no liability that the work they attest to (through regulatory obstacles) is of high or even good quality. For example, if you have a house built, it will have to be approved by government inspectors on many occasions for different purposes. However, if that house burns down later from faulty wiring that was inspected; the government that essentially told you it was safe carries no liability. This begs a tangential question: what is the point, exactly?

          Third, in fields that are “regulated” it has been made essentially illegal for people to work. To license something is defined as: the ability to grant a license to (someone or something) to permit the use of something or to allow an activity to take place. If something requires a license, it is otherwise illegal—ergo, it is illegal to work and earn a living if the government does not permit you to do so. Yet another disincentive towards working, just what we need!

          The rise in corporations over the last century is not due to not enough government. Inversely, it is due to too much government. I understand there is a long held belief in most people that government is there to help us, but we must get beyond misconceptions and use logic to approach questions. Whether a politician is well-intentioned or not, regulation still results in the same thing. Also, do not believe the hype that the Bush administration marked the biggest rollback of regulations in modern history—that could not be further from the truth. In fact, if you are a fan of regulation, you should have a picture of “W” over your mantle right next to your picture of Obama.

          If people actually understand what the true effects of regulation are, it is likely that we will tolerate less of it. However, I understand there is a draw in believing in wholesale regulation; the comfort of feeling like someone evil and rich is being halted on their wicked quest for world domination is probably great. But, perception a reality does not make. Regulation is the pet of “big business” that does not wish to compete and colorful plumage which politicians display to prove how “caring” and “egalitarian” they are; both, instead, use it largely as a tool to monopolize market segments and line their own pockets; perverting capitalism into cronyism.

          When you consider the effectiveness of government in solving all our problems you should truly ponder why all of governments “wars” of morality such as the one on drugs and the one on poverty have only resulted in more of both. Certainly, in the thousands of years of human history it is unlikely that humans have only recently gone bad; perhaps, we should realize that government has the anti-Midas effect of turning everything it touches into crap instead of gold.

 

The Fallacy of Greed

       Greed…what a fun word! It is that invisible cause of all of society’s problems, right? Have an older car or smaller house than your neighbor? Don’t beat yourself up, they are obviously greedy. Textile manufacturing is now (predominantly) overseas? Duh…just a greedy capitalist. Walmart not forking over that mythical thing called a “living wage?” They are blatantly exhibiting their own greed. She has too much; he has too little…all byproducts of American greed, right?

     Effort is good, the old college try they used to say; but don’t you dare actually succeed because clearly you have morphed into just a common greedy piece of trash. Here is an interesting question then: If, in fact, a person who develops a product for which millions wish to pay for is greedy; what do we call a person who is willing to live for nothing off the labors of others? Ah, I remember now, we call them victims of American greed. Instead might I suggest we call them greedy victimizers of Americans; merely a semantic difference, I am sure.

     The convenience of greed lay in its ability to be arbitrarily blamed for anything. Those on the left have made careers playing on peoples’ petty jealousy through use of the word greed. People have justified the taking of others’ property because of greed; however, greed cannot be proven and, perhaps more importantly, cannot be disproven. How does one combat an accusation of greed? They cannot, which is why it is such a powerful tool of the politician to ensure support from those who Bastiat noted “wish to live at the expense of others.”

     Legalized theft and redistribution gains its mandate from this notion of greed, but how do we define greed exactly? If greed is to be defined as the desire and effort to take something from people which is not theirs, then who is greedy? Can we rightfully call Steve Jobs greedy because he created things which many were willing to trade money for? Or would that title be more properly attributed to the 23 year old which, instead of practicing responsibility, decides to live off the welfare system? I would say the latter; our president would likely say the former. A person who makes a living at the point of a gun is, in my estimation, greedy. There is little difference between someone who is able-bodied and living (almost) exclusively off the taxpayer than there is a common gangster. Both prey off of those unable to defend themselves from their oppressors, the only difference is the mobster at least has the courage to do their own dirty work.

Liberty is the Root of Our Prosperity

     Without liberty, we lose that which makes America unique among the nations of the world, in both the past and the present.  It can hardly be said to be a coincidence that the most free people in the history of humanity have also become the most wealthy and powerful; but there are those who would wish to convince people that it was not our liberties which opened the door to prosperity…no, they would offer that prosperity was attained despite these freedoms.  What a lucky break it has been, then, that the nation where its people are free to imagine something greater and free to expect a return for their labors are the people who have exercised tremendous ingenuity and an incredible work ethic…go figure.  Imagine how many Steve Jobs, Henry Fords, or Nikola Teslas may have been lost to history in communal nations where it was the government’s job to determine people’s aptitudes or their worth to society and thus assign them their tasks?

    A common argument (read: excuse) of the collectivists is that we are a product of our resources; and yes, we do have those in abundance relative to some nations.  However, I would argue that our resources did not define us as a people; instead, we defined our resources.  Upon the ratification of the Constitution, the framers did not find a map to resources with a multi-lingual set of instructions for how to develop machines and methods to utilize them.  It was the liberty to develop, to invent, to discover, and ultimately to earn a reward for our labors that drove generations of Americans to develop those resources which would eventually increase the living standards of much of the entire planet.  That is not inconsequential, nor is it coincidental; that is a staggering feat for the ultimate benefit of all of humanity.

      I often ponder as to why our economic progress and achievements, due greatly to our level of freedom, is something to be ashamed of; particularly when we wonder why kids do not try to excel at school.  Is there not a link between denigrating success and a dwindling amount of it?  Perhaps instead of hiding from our prosperity, we should embrace the fact that we are the engine of advancement for the entire globe; then, just maybe the children of this generation and the next may return to aspiring for more and settling for nothing less than whatever it is their individual dreams may conjure.  The true “arrogance” of America is to enjoy the fruits of labor and the results of our capitalist, free-market society (at least it used to be) while simultaneously acting as if those were not significant accomplishments.

Government is Force: The Uncomfortable Truth People Wish to Avoid.

It stands to reason that where there’s sacrifice, there’s someone collecting sacrificial offerings. Where there’s service, there’s someone being served. The man who speaks to you of sacrifice, speaks of slaves and masters. And intends to be the master.

—Ayn Rand

     Our society speaks of things like social justice as if it were a victimless activity. As though giving to someone deemed “less fortunate” entails only the act giving without the taking. Where then does this magical manna come from if not from another citizen? Clearly it comes from someone who is rich or simply has what some deem to be “too much,” right? Let’s assume it does, is the moral righteousness of theft based on the size of the victim’s bank account? If that is in fact the case, should not most white collar crimes be considered righteous?  Or, for example, if you carjack a Maserati are you not merely taking what is not deserved by the owner of that car?

       The rich are hardly the only ones who are victims of our entitled society; anyone who falls into some sort of minority can find themselves targets of our burgeoning tyranny of democracy. If the limits on individual rights to property are up for a vote, then where do the limits of the state lay? In a society which justifies activity by a majority (more aptly, plurality) opinion, no limits exist; instead, the law is a shifting tide dictated by mob behavior and “popular” ideas. I can take your money, your property, and (more poignantly accurate) your very life as long as I can convince enough of my fellow citizens to direct the government to forcibly remove those things from you at the point of a gun.

          You say that no one is taking another’s life, but only their money; excess money at that? How is it exactly that we earn money? Time! Time of our life spent producing, thinking, building, growing, and teaching; and by endorsing the government confiscation and redistribution of people’s money we are very much endorsing the taking of people’s lives; one hour at a time. You cannot ask another for $10 without considering that the money you ask for represents a portion of their life spent earning (assuming they have earned that money). Likewise, you cannot empower government to separate them from that same $10 by force without considering that government has taken the time that money represents from them.

      The cold reality that people wish to ignore is that if that person gets paid $10/hr. then your government has exercised your desire to steal that hour from them; forcibly take those minutes, those breaths, and those heartbeats from them as if they rightfully belong to you or someone else. That activity relegates that producer to the role of slave and you take on the role of slave owner. What gives us the right to prey on our fellow citizens? Nothing! Still, we try to justify it with absurd notions of social justice and fairness. Those who are comfortable voting the confiscation of other’s money are no different than the pimp on the street corner preying on their hookers or the mobster running a protection scheme on businesses. Try as we may to justify our actions as assistance or some altruistic heroism; we are merely common thieves who ply our trade at the ballot box because we lack the courage to steal from others in person.

 

Why the government cannot fix healthcare.

     There is a significant obstacle facing government in any attempt at “fixing” the costs of medical care:  reality.  Yes, reality, that often loathed principle of life for which we cannot escape yet seem to try tirelessly to ignore.  Obamacare seeks to repair healthcare through government subsidy, an increase in the pool of insured (which may lower the cost of health insurance, but not the cost of medical care), and coercion of providers to lessen their own fees.  However, it apparently fundamentally ignores the two primary factors that actually dictate prices in a market.

        I am writing of supply and demand, which represents Adam Smith’s principle of the “invisible hand” that guides the market and allocates goods in a world of unlimited wants and limited resources; in other words, that is how scarcity is dealt with.  Rationing is an undeniable fact of life and is the basis for all prices.  Government’s attempt to control the health market without addressing scarcity of supply and an overabundance of demand is doomed to failure from the word go.  Additionally, transferring the costs of health care through subsidy does not make it any cheaper, it only transfers those costs from direct medical payments to increased tax liability or to increased deficit spending; and amounts to more of a Chris Angel illusion than a solution.

        What about the fines for those who do not purchase healthcare you might ask?  Well, to state it simply, they are largely irrelevant.  The most recent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projections show that approximately six million people (and counting) will incur fines of approximately $1500 each (FYI:  that could be you), amounting to somewhere between $8 and $9 billion in revenues to the government.  There are two main problems with using the fines as a way to offset increasing prices.  First, government subsidies for insurance will undoubtedly exceed the fines.  Second, people who did not purchase insurance previously so they could save money will likely pay the fine as opposed to obtaining insurance (which would be significantly more expensive) and still will not pay their bills when they go to the hospital; thus maintaining the “free rider” status quo (in Pelosi parlance).

        Another important aspect to consider is that, as fines to employers are cheaper overall than actually carrying insurance, there is likely to be an increase in the number of uninsured, which previously were covered at work and thus more people receiving subsidies for insurance, or incurring fines for that matter (once again, this could be you).  This does not even factor in the likelihood that those employers who are on or near the threshold requiring them to provide insurance or pay the fine, which would result in a loss in income for the business owner (and thus a decrease in “revenues” to the federal government), will cut back employees (unemployment), trim some back to part-time (under-employment), or be hesitant of growing their business (an even more stagnant job market).

        All of these negatives…and pricing has not even been addressed.  Ironically, the only potential part of Obamacare that might affect pricing, the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) (or, death panels in Palin parlance), is denied to be a rationing board.  If it is a rationing panel, we have a bureaucratically operated health lottery for old people (and, at some point, probably poor people through Medicaid); if it is not, the disparity between supply and demand will remain, or worsen, and costs will not change (downward anyway)…or will they?  It is actually irrelevant if Democrats are right and it is not a rationing panel; if it is a rationing panel prices will be curbed by decreased access (i.e.-less people getting care, which I thought they were trying to remedy…?).  However, pricing will be affected if they are absolutely correct and it is not a rationing panel, but a direct price controlling board:  overall costs will likely stay the same at best.  Now, if a price ceiling is imposed, that will restrict the number of providers wishing to enter the market (hospitals, doctors, nurses, etc.) and reduce the number of manufacturers wishing to develop and produce goods for health care (medical equipment, drugs, etc.).  We can remedy this, though, so all is not lost; let us reduce the obstacles to entry into those markets making it cheaper and easier to get “qualified” providers and manufacturers.  Do not begin rejoicing yet, that means the guy who was previously going to go into golf course management (with a 17 on his ACT) can now, for just a few dollars and years more, become a doctor.  Scared yet?  By this action we have reduced pricing by reducing quality (and probably increasing mortality) This must not be the case though as we have been assured quality will not suffer, so that must not be the plan either, right?

        There are three ways you can actually reduce the cost (and thus pricing) in healthcare:  1) increase supply through a reduction in obstacles to entry into the market (accomplished through reduced admission requirements into med school, increasing maximum entry quotas into med school, and establishing more med schools, etc. etc.); 2) we can reduce demand by letting more people die without care (Kevorkian care, anyone?  I do not think any of us like the sound of that…); 3) freeze the development of new technology in medical care (technology gets cheaper over time, particularly when you remove the need to mark-up to cover future research and development).  In fact, if we would have frozen medical technology one hundred years ago, costs would be next to nothing now; of course, bleeding would still be the primary cure for most ills.  On the “bright side” this would have maintained the “promised” costs of Social Security by freezing mortality for people to a point in which almost nobody would have lived long enough to collect it.

        Another fallacy proposed by both parties is that reducing fraud in Medicare will reduce the overall cost; however, this will only reduce the cost to government as pricing will have to increase to individuals to cover lost fraudulent revenues to providers.  This amounts to another cost sleight of hand, the alternate equivalent to that of subsidizing insurance.  Ultimately, if we are all dedicated to reducing the cost of healthcare, which would you choose?  Rationing does exist in the market, and that will not be eliminated through the government control of it unless quality or technology is influenced to address pricing.  Collectively, we must decide whether we will pay more for more — or wish to pay less for less; that is an undeniable fact of life in any market.  Whether you are a Republican or Democrat is irrelevant because neither is being honest about the problem because the voting public values fantasy over facts; ultimately, there is no solution that maintains technology and quality of service, increases access, and reduces costs.

        But, before we tinker with the most technologically advanced healthcare system in the world, perhaps we should try out these theories on the bubble gum market which will at least not result in the death of people so that politicians may try to “muddle through” to a solution which is patently unrealistic.  If the new “Obamagum” plan worked as they say Obamacare will, gum prices will go down (as will the overall cost of gum nationally), more people will be chewing gum, and there will be vastly better increases in gum technology.  If they are wrong, gum will not increase in quantity (relative to the increase in demand), variety of flavors and manufacturers will decrease, and the overall cost of gum and the gum market will increase.  Sounds like a safer experiment to me.  Please, let us refrain from killing people to just to prove that central planning and socialism still does not work!  Fair enough?

Poverty: are we treating the disease or just the symptom?

Poverty is an all important topic in America today.  In fact, there has been considerable conversation about it since LBJ declared “war on poverty” in 1964; however, beyond the typical rhetoric that poverty is bad and people cannot be left to die in the street nothing is really seriously discussed.  If one argues that entitlements are ineffective, inefficient, and just plain theft they are castigated as being hateful, greedy, or insensitive.  But, with all the spending which has taken place over the last 50 years, what do we really have to show for it?  Are we spending money trying to cure the symptom instead of the disease?  It seems likely with government’s proclivity towards throwing good money at bad “solutions” that we are ultimately ignoring that which causes poverty; all so feelings are spared and political cover is well preserved.

Entitlements are necessary?  Let us look at the numbers.  President Lyndon B. Johnson, in all his glory, declares war on poverty in 1964.  In 1968, the first publication of a poverty report by the Census Bureau is published; at the time the poverty rate is approximately 13% and the beginning estimate from 1950 is 22%. Good work LBJ?  Not so fast, Scooter.  The poverty rate had been descending steadily before the “war on poverty” began and continued its descent until a trough in 1969.  However, if you just cannot help but want to give LBJ credit for some of that decline, fair enough—from the time the “war” was declared to the trough saw a reduction from a level of approximately 17% down to the 12% level.  Hoorah for government spending!!!!!  So, after 50 years of enormous and blossoming entitlement spending to eliminate poverty what is the poverty rate now?  Drum roll, please—more than 15%.  Hmmmm…that was rather anti-climactic wasn’t it?

I have it!  Maybe poverty is up, but I bet all this socialism has closed the income gap!  Wrong again, Scooter! Since the late 1960s, income inequality has been rising quite impressively. So, why is it that after trillions of dollars having been spent in the name of poverty; are the poverty numbers really not improved since about 1967? Could it be that in our fervor over poverty we have misdiagnosed the condition? I suspect that, outside of some people who are legitimately (yes, I said it) handicapped, people often continue to be poor for the same reason rich people tend to get richer: they keep doing precisely what it was that made them that way in the first place.

Our society not only accepts less effort and apathy with regard to personal responsibility; we incentivize it.  If bad behavior is without consequence, you can be assured it will be repeated; if you give out cash prizes for it, it will really be repeated.  Don’t believe me? Test it out on your kids.  Every time your child hits another child, give them a candy bar or some other reward; I bet your kid will be hitting other children with lightning speed and efficiency in no time at all! Reverse your reward system and dis-incentivize that behavior and it will (perhaps less quickly) disappear…unless your child is a sociopath then you should have just taken my word for it.  In essence, that is what we have done as a nation; we have told people that not trying is good enough…that working on excuses can be equally or more profitable than actual production.  We have lied to ourselves and to those who feed at the government trough trapping them in a slavish-type relationship with government.  There is no success in a lack of effort nor can this situation continue in perpetuity.

Sadly, by subsidizing a lack of effort we relegate those who truly cannot earn for themselves to a life of poverty and squalor.  Handicapped people often live in poor conditions, so lazy people can comfortably watch Jerry Springer and Maury Povich.  But, we all know that is not the real reason…the real reason is so the aristocrats that loom over us from D.C. can continue to earn votes in exchange for other’s wealth.  Yet, as long as they have “good intentions” their failures, waste, lies, and theft will be excused.  Unfortunately, those in the ruling class do not have to live out the consequences of their actions; that is suffered most severely by the poor they claim to champion.  This makes the leaders we choose the most despicable kind of parasite.